Flow

Flow

Comments:

'Flow' is a very personal and individual 'moment' and is rarely shared amongst students as the experience and
stimulus is different for every student.

Csikszentmihalyi describes a state of flow as one when we are at our most receptive and creative.
Group activities are particularly 'high' on flow as opposed to chalk and talk / lecture type activities which are not.

8 factors of activities that promote flow:
  1. requires concentration.
  2. offers a reasonable chance for success/completion
  3. includes a clear articulation of goals
  4. provides immediate or ongoing feedback
  5. involves "deep but effortless involvement;" removes worries and frustrations of everyday life
  6. allows for a sense of control
  7. concerns for self disappear; i.e., inhibitions, stage fright, and embarrassment
  8. sense of time is altered.

Questions

how can 'flow' be maintained and how can the teacher handle it when some people in a group are experiencing 'flow' and others are not?

Viewing


Video presentation given by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi : http://www.616.ips.k12.in.us/Theories/Flow/default.aspx

Reading


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow
Flow in games :http://jenovachen.com/flowingames/flowtheory.htm
http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/en/Flow_theory
http://www.brainchannels.com/thinker/mihaly.html
Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York: Harper and Row.